check out these jazz piano solo transcription books and the songs they include:

https://www.sheetmusic1.com/jazz.piano.html#71

these transcriptions are accurate and make a good source for jazz pianists looking for sheet music.  

this seems to me that a lot of the jazz piano solos have already been transcribed. does this make up the majority?
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loveforjazz didn't say anything inappropriate at all, i just wanted to replace his link with one that would give ljp some credit if someone bought a book.

original message with new book link:

----------------

check out these jazz piano solo transcription books and the songs they include:

https://search.musicnotes.com/?cat=music+books&instrument1=piano&q=jazz+piano+transcription

these transcriptions are accurate and make a good source for jazz pianists looking for sheet music.

this seems to me that a lot of the jazz piano solos have already been transcribed. does this make up the majority?
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many (but not all) solos have been transcribed.  but i am no sure that these artists played the same transcription every time.
take monk for instance.  there had to be quite a few variations of his solos!
each book contains at least 6 to 80 solos.
scot, were you already aware of all these jazz piano solo transcription books before i even posted the link on ljp?
my boogie woogie teacher told me that he chooses to learn a jazz style that is not written down. more and more jazz is being written down but the boogie woogie is still being learned by ear. i said to him that i choose to learn by ear too. he says that i don't need to learn by ear when almost all the jazz has already been transcribed. so that's when i searched the internet and found that link.
most of them i'm aware of, i used to spend a lot of time perusing jazz books in stores and online.

jmkarns- most jazzers play different solos each time when they perform a song, though there are many players who will definitely play some of the same licks that they did before.
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art tatum always played new solos. it made him sound like they were totally new jazz arrangements. however, he was one of those many players that used the same runs over and over again.
"he says that i don't need to learn by ear when almost all the jazz has already been transcribed."

unfortunately a lot of the transcriptions(especially solo piano ones) are inaccurate.  i would use the transcriptions as a supplement to learning by ear.  i play a lot of stride piano, and i have yet to find a transcription book that is accurate.
the transcription books that i recommended are very accurate. they may not be 100% accurate, but the majority of those piano solos in those books are accurately transcribed.
dalty52,  

i love to play stride too! have you checked out the jelly roll morton, art tatum, fats waller, oscar peterson, and teddy wilson books that are on that link that i posted above?
thomas ''fats'' waller: the great solos 1929-1941 -- paul posnak, hal leonard

ferdinand "jelly roll" morton: the collected piano music: piano solo  
by jelly roll morton, james dapogny (editor)  

harlem stride piano solos/f0693 (paperback)
by riccardo scivales (author)

those are the three major stride piano books. those are very accurate.
wonder if you checked those out dalty?
how's the teddy wilson book? if you could have only one stride piano transcription book, one that would have practical appliactions for your own playing,  which one would it be?
" it'd be art.
mine would probably be art too. art tatum sums up the whole stride piano thing.
i should mention that you don't get much overall benefit from buying transcription books unless you're looking to learn a few licks.

the only way to get the full benefit of transcriptions is if you do them yourself because the main benefit of transcriptions is in strengthening your ears, not learning notes for your fingers.

doing one transcription on your own is worth a whole shelf full of books that you buy as far as benefiting your playing goes.
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Use the contact link at the top of the page.
i'm not sure that transcribing anything really develops your sense of improvisation. improvisation is more about vocabulary and the elements of music. the elements of jazz improvisation could be applied to classical improvisation, rock music, country, and new age music as well.
"

transcribing the masters is the first best way to get vocabulary.
transcription is probably the thing that most develops your sense of improvisation. you are training yourself to reproduce what you hear, which is what soloing is. also, you learn vocabulary, and learn swing and phrasing. by habitually playing along with the recording as well, you incorporate the phrasing and nuance, and begin to make associations in your brain: look at what the rhythm section is playing; what is the soloist doing?

transcription is the number one thing that you could do to become a better jazz player. guaranteed. i think anybody that's transcribed a lot would agree.

some players say that they have never transcribed, but they are a complete rarity; and most commonly they have learned lots of things from recordings, tunes, voicings, licks, they just don't call it transcribing because they never took down a complete solo verbatim.

hm
totally agree with the hepcatmonk.
"i love to play stride too! have you checked out the jelly roll morton, art tatum, fats waller, oscar peterson, and teddy wilson books that are on that link that i posted above?"

yeah, i have them all, but, unfortunately, none of those books are accurate. i would say posnak's book is the most accurate of the three.  the jelly roll book is pretty weak, imo.  i honestly can't believe they published it with as many errors as it has. there are even parts where things are written in the wrong octave!

if i were you, i'd look at these transcription books as way to help get an idea of what's going on in the style, but, when it comes to actually learning stuff, there's no substitute for the recordings.
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