any tips or listening suggestions for playing intros?
maybe some of your favorites?
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over the years intros have become second nature.  at first i had no idea what was going on, but basically a good intro is based on two or three things.

1. simple chord progression, most often a 3-6-2-5 or something like that, most often repeated a few times, winding up on the dominant of the opening chord of the song.

2. some melodic snippet taken from the melody (as in what they did with honeysuckle rose above) that you play over the simple chord progression above.

3. or, create a composed intro ala joy spring
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thanks scott. i guess what is intriguing to me right now is the full sound of harmonizing the melody and the movements as opposed to single note melody.
and also the movement and voicings in the left hand.

as far as the right hand i'm not sure if its drops, thirds, octaves. but it sounds good in the high registers.
the harmonization of single notes is a good skill to get down.  take a look at some keith jarrett transcriptions, there's some great examples in there.

the other best place to get good ideas for that is looking at conductor scores for big band arrangements, especially count basie.  there are also some tricks of the trade and the mark levine jazz piano book sums those things up.

harmonizing single note lines isn't as tricky though as it looks or sounds.  there is really just one point to keep in mind when harmonizing melodies.

and it is this: you're almost always harmonizing in a certain key, and that key pertains to the part of the chord progression you're in, not the key of the song (though they may overlap at times.)  regardless of the key of the song, if your melody to harmonize covers the chords am to d7, a 2-5 in g, your harmonies will be in the key of g, and probably based on am and d7.

example of the notes | b > c > d > e | b with am for the first two and d7 for the second two, and gm7 for the b.

the b note would be part of an am9, the c would be the 7th of a d7, the d would be part of am11, and e would be the 9th of a d7, and then a gm7 chord for the b.

if you were going to a gm chord, then you would change the d7 and am appropriates with b9 and b5 to give it a more natural slide into the gm sound.

sorry if you know all this, thought i'd share just in case!
If I'm not back in 24 hours, call the president.

Scot is available for skype jazz piano lessons (and google hangouts, phone call, etc...)
Use the contact link at the top of the page.
one of my favorite intros.  

regarding the rules of is chording the melody (drop 2 style)just like bud did.... below bill dobbins shows a good example of what i was referring to:

for example how would you do this for a tune like autumn leaves?
head is g a bb eb...so would it just be a drop 2 walk up of cm chord because all the notes are chord tones? i gues you could throw dim notes in between g and a
or is this a bad tune to do this on because melody is sparse?

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