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official plug:

"mark levine, long-time pianist with cal tjader, is a concord jazz recording artist who has recorded with such jazz greats as joe henderson, camen mcrae, richie cole, mark murphy, houston pearson, and many others."
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There are 8 comments, leave a comment.
yeah... i've been with it since july 2000, when i came across jazz in a workshop i attended. at that time, i didn't really know how to study. i went through the book in less than 1 month, but i didn't grasp much of its content. it's going 5 years now, and i am still studying it. it's like a library of ideas for me: just pick your favorite and dig in!
for a jazz beginner, i would say it's a little tricky as it develops to more specific tech, if the aspiring pianist isn't quite familiar with the jazz sound. but i must confess that it took my music view to a new place. yes. the book is great. i love the language he uses, as if he was talking to us personally. very nice work.  
mark levine is a great, nice and very kind gentleman. he answered my emails in a very friendly way.  
get the book. learn it. take your time and take your playing to the next level.  
peace!
i think it is bill evans ,hands down (pardon the pun}
got the book for christmas and had to find out that the pure basics of theory are left out, am i right? so i delay working my way through the book until i have a basic understanding of theory, playing and knowing all the major scales, basic harmony, knowing the jazz chord symbols and what they mean etc.

i do this by going through albetans beginner area here and on  www.musictheory.net

can't wait to start the "real" learning, though, but without basics, well you know...
no, don't delay your working through the book, there's no point in delaying. you don't need to completely understand and know theory to know what sounds good.  just go through the book, find things that sound cool, and work on them.

if you wait until you understand everything theoretical, then you're going to be left behind.

the idea of jazz is to have some fun, start jamming as soon as possible, just jump in and do it.  no matter what your level, i'm sure you can find something that will be useful in the book. a new chord voicing, a cool lick, a new progression that you can use.

there is no such thing as "real" learning. learning is learning, no matter what level you're at, so don't handicap yourself by thinking that way.
If I'm not back in 24 hours, call the president.

Scot is available for skype jazz piano lessons (and google hangouts, phone call, etc...)
Use the contact link at the top of the page.
i've been with the book and struggling..  the first few chapters will be a breeze/review for people who know basics, but from there on, it's all extremely specific, as cesar braga said.  

don't get me wrong, it's a solid, "better be in your shelf or die" kind of book, extremely well written with info you won't find elsewhere.  but it seems to me that at time the book starts sounding like a "list" of voicings..  sometimes there's a song for the chapter, but most times it seems a little blunt.. ("figure 8-6 shows two variations of the g7 alt chord")

i'm taking my time with each chapter..  sort of using the book as a general guideline of all my practicing.  so i'd stay on a chapter for months, while doing all sorts of other songs and exercises 'till i gain enough experience to understand atleast a good portion of the chapter.
yeah, it's definitely not a beginner book, however this book along with a book such as the blues book (or the jazz book probably) by tim richards would probably work really well together.
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Use the contact link at the top of the page.
hi,

does somebody know to exercise the skales from mark levine´s jazz piano book chapter 11 (exactly 11-2). i don´t know the fingersettigs of the continuous up an downplaying skales, they aren´t given there. if i play the ionic skale up, should i play the doric skale down starting with the 5th finger? or another one?

thanks if somebody had practised it and could help me..

rob
i'm not sure of your terminology, but i would tread the 11-2 scale exercise kind of like the hanon exercises.  add an "extra" finger on the way up so you always land on the right finger on the way down.

specifically:

right hand:
up: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
down: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2
up: 1 etc...

left hand:
up: 5 4 3 2 1 4 3 2
down: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4
up: 5 etc...

hope that makes  
If I'm not back in 24 hours, call the president.

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Use the contact link at the top of the page.
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Jazz Piano Notebook Series
Scot Ranney's Jazz Piano Notebook, Volume 1 - jazz piano tricks of the trade

Volume 1 of this educational jazz piano book contains 15 jazz piano exercises, tricks, and other interesting jazz piano techniques, voicings, grooves, and ideas Scot Ranney enjoys playing.

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Scot Ranney's Jazz Piano Notebook, Volume 2 - jazz piano tricks of the trade you can use today
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Volume 2 has 14 jazz piano exercises and tricks of the trade, and quite a bit of it is Calypso jazz piano related material, including some Monty Alexander and Michel Camilo style grooves. Jazz piano education is through the ears, but books like this can help.

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Tim Richards' Jazz Piano Notebook - jazz piano tricks of the trade

Volume 3 contains 12 jazz piano exercises and explorations by the acclaimed jazz piano educator, pianist, author, and recording artist Tim Richards.

Tim wrote the well known "Exploring Jazz Piano" and "Improvising Blues Piano" books and has several others to his name.

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Jeff Brent's Jazz Piano Notebook - jazz piano tricks of the trade

Volume 4 is by Jeff Brent, a jazz pianist, composer, teacher, and author of "Modalogy" and other acclaimed jazz theory and education books. In this book Jeff shares detailed analysis of transcriptions of live performances. He covers everything from the shape of the songs to the tricks and licks he uses in improvised lines to the ideas behind his lush chord voicings.

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