guys,
what do you do when you think/feel your progress has flat-lined for a while? listen to great records? plunk away on the piano anyway? find a good teacher or watch someone else much better than yourself....

certainly, different things work for different people. just wondering what some of you have a done to stay inspired, and reached your impressive levels of proficiency.  

any jazz oriented motivating resources out there on the web will also appreciated.
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i will either:

a.  take a break from practicing for a few days or a week.
b.  take a break from what i have been practicing and look at something competely different.

it's always good to give your brain a rest on a particular subject.  if you feel like the whole thing has flatlined, then it might be time to take a small break.  this is not an excuse to take a break all of the time.  once in a while it's needed, though.  your brain can do a lot of improving away from the instrument.  for instance, the other morning i learned this james p. johnson tune and played it at a gig later that night.  it went alright, but, i definitely needed to do some work on it.  well, i actually didn't play the thing for like 3 days after that.  when i came to play it, it was tons better.  i think this is due to the fact that my brain had time to process the information.  i know nothing about neuroscience, but it seems logical that this would occur.

i think in general practice,  it is good to rotate what you cover.  so, monday, you shed voice leading.  tuesday you transcribe.  wednesday you work on octave lines.  thursday back to voice leading.  friday transcription.....etc.  of course..........i tend to transcribe everyday, but with everything else, i rotate.  this helps keep me motivated, and maybe it will work for you.
i find it helpful to "take a vacation" away from the piano for a spell. absence does make the heart grow fonder, so when you get back to the ivories, you tend to enjoy it & are grateful for the skills that you do have more. it's a  relativity thing. also our "flat-lined" place is more than likely well ahead of many players who would love to trade places with us. we're our own worse critics.

there are definitey exercises well worth working on. i for example really like w-i-d-e (over one octave) voicings in the same hand. they sound so neato.
could you tell more about those w-i-d-e voicings?
i like doing that with dominant chords:

bb7 = ab,d,g,bb or ab, d, bb or ab,d,c,g,bb

or, combined with the lh, you could have, for f7:

lh:  f, eb, a  rh: eb, ab, d, f
"     "   "         rh: eb, ab, b, d, f
"  "     "          rh: eb, a, b, d, f
for example in rh: 7 5 b9 / +9 1 +11 / 1 6 +9 / b9 6 b9 3  
in these individual examples the lh could be 1 7 3. you'll notice the voicing in the first three examples is a m6 & a tritone.

here's one i like...lh. g c e a         rh. d g b e
                       (5 1 3 6)           (9 5 m7 3)

of course both hands don't have to be wide.
darn! i forgot to hit "force message formatting". grrr.
thanks guys! i am taking a trip in the next couple of days, that will surely be a good break from the ivories!
saw mccoy tyner perform tonight (sat 5 ft. from the piano) - fabulous.
that got me re-energized!
guys,
what do you do when you think/feel your progress has flat-lined for a while? listen to great records? plunk away on the piano anyway? find a good teacher or watch someone else much better than yourself....

certainly, different things work for different people. just wondering what some of you have a done to stay inspired, and reached your impressive levels of proficiency.  

any jazz oriented motivating resources out there on the web will also appreciated.
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